Paul Scinocca REALTOR®

phone: 997-0651
email: paulscinocca@shaw.ca
 
Paul Scinocca
Royal LePage

Paul Scinocca
Royal LePage Top Producers


6-1549 St. Mary's Road
Winnipeg, Manitoba
R2M 5G9


Cell: (204) 997-0651
Bus: (204) 989-6900
Fax: (204) 257-6382
Email: paulscinocca@shaw.ca


  

Buying

Buying a Home: What Expenses to Expect

Budgeting for a new home can be tricky. Not only are there mortgage installments and the down payment to consider, there are a host of other—sometimes unexpected—expenses to add to the equation. The last thing you want is to be caught financially unprepared, blindsided by taxes and other hidden costs on closing day.

These expenses vary: some of them are one-time costs, while others will take the form of monthly or yearly installments. Some may not even apply to your particular case. But it’s best to educate yourself about all the possibilities, so you will be prepared for any situation, armed with the knowledge to budget accordingly for your move. Use the following list to determine which costs will apply to your situation prior to structuring your budget:

1.Purchase offer deposit.

2.Inspection by certified building inspector.

3.Appraisal fee: Your lending institution may request an appraisal of the property. The cost of this appraisal is your responsibility.

4.Survey fee: If the home you’re purchasing is a resale (as opposed to a newly built home), your lending institution may request an updated property survey. The cost for this survey will be your responsibility and will range from $700 to $1000.

5.Mortgage application at your lending institution.


6.5% GST: this fee applies to newly built homes only, or existing homes that have recently undergone extensive renovations.


7.Legal fees:
A lawyer should be involved in every real estate transaction to review all paperwork. Experience and rates offered by lawyers range quite a bit, so shop around before you hire.

8.Homeowner’s insurance:
Your home will serve as security against your loan for your financial institution. You will be required to buy insurance in an amount equal to or greater than the mortgage loan.

9.Land transfer (purchase) tax:
This tax applies in any situation in which a property changes owners and can vary greatly.

10.Moving expenses.


11.Service charges:
Any utilities you arrange for at your new home, such as cable or telephone, may come with an installation fee.

12.Interest adjustments.


13.Renovation of new home:
In order to “make it their own,” many new homeowners like to paint or invest in other renovations prior to or upon moving in to their new home. If this is your plan, budget accordingly.

14.Maintenance fees:
If you are moving to a new condominium, you will likely be charged a monthly condo fee which covers the costs of common area maintenance.

Know the Market before You Buy

The asking prices of most homes on the market indicate the current state of the market, and usually mirror the prices for which other similar homes in the area have recently sold. In deciding upon a selling price, a home-seller must establish a balance between the desire to draw the highest offer and finding a price that will be reasonable enough to attract an appropriate pool of prospects, and competitive offers. While most selling agents counsel their clients to consider this equation when pricing their home, keep in mind that some homes are not properly priced.

It’s important to educate yourself about the current market before approaching the purchase of a home. The market will always influence a property’s value, regardless of the state of a home, or its desirability. Here are the types of market conditions and how they may affect you:

1.Seller’s Market:

A seller’s market is considered a “hot” market. This type of market is created when demand is greater than supply—that is, when the number of buyers exceeds the number of homes on the market. As a result, these homes usually sell very quickly, and there are often multiple offers. As a buyer, you need to consider that many homes will sell above the asking price; in other words, you may have less room to negotiate, and may encounter competing offers. Though most buyers want to get a home for the lowest price possible, reducing your offer could mean opening the door for another buyer instead.

2.Buyer’s Market:

A buyer’s market is a slower market. This type of market occurs when supply is greater than demand, the number of homes exceeding the number of buyers. Properties are more likely to stay on the market for a longer period of time. Fewer offers will come in, and with less frequency. Prices may even decline during this period. As a buyer, you will have more selection and flexibility in terms of negotiating toward a lower price. Even if your initial offered price is too low, the seller will be more likely to come back with a counter-offer, so you can begin the process of negotiation.

3.Balanced Market:

In a balanced market, supply equals demand, the number of homes on the market roughly equal to the number of buyers. When a market is balanced there aren’t any concrete rules guiding whether you should make an offer at the higher end of your range, or the lower end. Prices will be stable, and homes will sell within a reasonable period of time. You will have a decent number of homes to choose from, and may encounter some competition for offers on the home of your choice, or none at all.

Before you make an offer to purchase a home, establish whether the current market is a Buyer’s, Seller’s, or Balanced market. Also, evaluate the price similar properties have sold for in the area, and the length of time these properties spent on the market. Determine how the home you’re considering compares to these other sales. Is this one over-priced, under-priced, or a fair price? By establishing this information prior to making an offer, you will be in a position to negotiate the best price for the home and be prepared for any additional opportunities that may come your way.

Keep in mind, a realtor is trained to provide clients with this information about the market, helping you make the most informed decision possible. The right realtor will guide you through the ups and downs of the market and keep you up-to-date with the types of changes you might expect. These realtor resources and connections will prove to be invaluable as you navigate the real estate market.

The other main factors that affect market value are:

1.Location:

The proximity of the home to amenities, such as schools, parks, public transportation, and stores will affect its status on the market. Also, the quality of neighbourhood planning, and future plans for development and zoning will influence a home’s current market value, as well as the ways in which it might change.

2.Property:

The age, size, layout, style, and quality of construction of the building will all affect a property’s market value, as well as the size, shape, seclusion and landscaping of the yard.

3.Condition of the Home:

This includes the general condition of the home’s main systems, such as the furnace, central air, electrical system, etc., as well as the appearance and condition of the fixtures, the floor plan of the house, and its first appearances.

4.Comparable Properties:

Examine the selling and asking prices of similar homes in the neighbourhood. Ask your Realtor to prepare you a general market analysis of the neighbourhood you’re interested in, so you can determine a range of value for a particular property. A market analysis will provide you with a market overview and give you a glimpse at what other similar properties have been selling for in that area.

5.Market Conditions/ Economy:

The market value of a home is additionally affected by the number of homes currently on the market, the number of people looking to buy property, current mortgage rates, and the condition of the national and local economy.

Stop Paying Your Landlord! Own Your Own Home

The thousands of dollars in rent you’ve already paid to your landlord may be a staggering figure—one you don’t even want to think about. Buying a house just isn’t possible for you right now. And it isn’t in your financial cards for the foreseeable future. Or is it? The situation is common and widespread: countless people feel trapped in home rental, pouring thousands of dollars into a place that will never be their own—yet they think they’re unable to produce a down payment for a home in order to escape this rental cycle. However, putting the buying process into motion isn’t nearly as impossible as it may seem. No matter how dire you believe your financial situation to be, there are several little-known facts that may be key to helping you step from a renter’s rut to home-owning paradise!

Initially, of course, the most daunting factor involved in buying a house is the down payment. You know you’ll be able to handle the monthly payments—you’ve done this for years as a renter. The hurdle, instead, seems to be accumulating the capital needed to put money down. However, this hurdle may be smaller than you think. Take a look at the following points and explore whether any of these scenarios may be possible for you:

1.Find a lender to assist you with your down payment and closing costs.

If you’re free of debt, and own an asset outright, your lending institution may lend you the money for a down payment by securing it against your asset. In this case, you won’t need to have accumulated capital for a down payment.

2.Buy a home even if your credit isn’t top-notch.

If you have saved more than the minimum for a down payment, or can secure the loan against other equity, many lending institutions will still consider you for a mortgage, despite a poor credit rating.

3.Find a seller to assist you in buying and financing the home.

Some sellers may be willing to bear a second mortgage as a seller take-back. The seller then assumes the role of the lending institution, and you pay him/her the monthly payments, rather than paying the price of the home in a lump sum. This is an additional option if you have a poor credit rating.

4.Buy a home with much less down than you’d think.

Investigate local and federal programs, such as first-time buyer programs, that are designed to help people like you break into the housing market. An experienced real estate agent will be equipped to give you all the information you need about these programs, and counsel you on which options are best for you.

5.Create a cash down payment without going into debt.

By borrowing money for specific investments, you may be able to produce a large income tax return that you can use as a down payment. Technically, the money borrowed for these investments is considered a loan, but the monthly payments can be low, and the money you put into both the home and the investments will ultimately be yours.

So, you know there are options out there. The next step is to educate yourself on what your own personal possibilities might be, and how to follow through with the means to achieve these goals. Keep in mind, too, that you can get pre-approved for a mortgage before you begin searching for a home. In fact, you should get pre-approved—the process is free and doesn’t place you under any obligation. You can be pre-approved over the phone. Or, take the next step and complete a credit application. Once a credit application is submitted, you’ll receive a written pre-approval, which will guarantee you a mortgage to a specified level. When you have a concrete price range, you’ll know where to begin looking. Make a commitment to yourself to break out of the renting rut. Start today!